Aftermarket magazine’s anniversary

Published:  14 September, 2017

It’s 25 years since Aftermarket was first published. Here we look back at the history of the magazine, and the sector

The automotive sector has changed a great deal since Aftermarket started in 1992. Most of the vehicles that would have been coming through the doors of the average garage 25 years ago are long gone, and some of the companies that made those cars have also gone too.

In 1992, the Rover Metro was still very much in production. Due to the legislative environment of the time, most of the Metros being seen in the aftermarket would have still been under the Austin marque. Rover finally went under in 2005, and the Metro has gone from being one of the most common cars on the road to being a rarer sight than a Morris Minor. Other cars and brands have come and gone during the period All these changes had an impact on the aftermarket as specialists in particular brands would need to re-focus their businesses to reflect the new reality.

Most of the other mainstream manufacturers of the time are still with us. Many of the vehicle names from brands like Nissan and VW still around too, like the Micra, Golf and Polo. The actual cars are quite different though.


Diesel decades
Over the years the magazine covered the changing face of the car parc, and the shift in the innards too. In 1992, diesel cars were still relatively unusual in the UK, but within a decade they had become as popular as petrol engine vehicles. Aftermarket tracked the rise of diesel, and helped readers get to grips with the technology. Many technical articles over the years were dedicated to explaining how to understand and fix problems in diesel engine vehicles. Over the last few years the magazine has been tracking its travails too following Dieselgate. Today we cover the ever-increasing complexity of diesel engine vehicles as much as we look at what might ultimately replace them.


Part of the process
Then there’s the advance of vehicle electronics. This was a growing area in the early 1990s, and it’s a growing area now. The progress from single ECUs on the more advanced vehicles to the situation today where even the most basic cars are fully equipped with a host of systems has been dizzying. The magazine has been on hand to provide advice and expert opinion from a range of sources.

The make up of parts has changed too, mostly for the better.  Until 1999, asbestos was commonly used as friction material in clutches, automatic transmission and brake linings, and gaskets. The use of asbestos in these parts was banned from 1999. There was an exception for pre-1973 vehicles, which allowed these vehicles to continue to be fitted with brake shoes containing asbestos right up until 2004.


BER
Of course, probably the biggest change came through the 2002 Block Exemption Regulation (BER) that allowed independents to work on new cars without invalidating the warranty. This came into force in October 2003. Aftermarket was fully behind the campaign to get this change made for the benefit of consumers and the industry alike. Once in law, the magazine continued to back efforts by the industry to make sure businesses and motorists were able to exercise their rights freely. The Right to Repair campaign and similar activities received strong support from the magazine through the 00s and beyond as a result.

These are just a few of the broad trends. Every year would have seen a thousand stories told about the sector. Aftermarket was the messenger bringing them to the readers.


The founder of the feast
Aftermarket was founded by Bob Sockl in 1992. Let’s examine how it all began...

Sometimes a decision can be made by someone else that affects you in an extraordinary way. Losing your job can be a springboard to do something wonderful with your life. Of course it doesn't feel like that at the time, but why let that get in the way of a good story? After all, Aftermarket magazine owes its existence to a redundancy. Bob had worked his way up the media ladder over the years. By the early 1990s  he was in a senior role at publishing company Morgan Grampian. As publishing director on a number of titles covering the automotive sector, he had what appeared to be a good seat at the metaphorical table. Big job, big company, and hopefully big money. Sounds great doesn't it? Sadly nothing lasts forever, and with the UK economy tanking as the 1990s began, no one was immune from the threat of redundancy.

Some readers may shudder when they remember the recession Britain experienced at the start of that decade. Many people found themselves suddenly out of work in what was a bleak and at times particularly nasty economic period. Sadly publishing directors were no exception: "I got made redundant from Morgan Grampian where I had been in charge of Transport Week and Auto Trade."


New title
Bob, not being the sort to take things lying down, dusted himself off and examined his options: "I looked at the situation, and knowing the people I knew from my time at Morgan Grampian I thought I could put together a team, and start a new title.

"We quickly put together an aftermarket-knowledgeable team, and we created a replacement for the old Auto Trade magazine, where I had been publishing director. We created the new magazine. When it was first launched in 1992, it was called Garage and Bodyshop Products (GBP). That name lasted about 18 months, and then we decided to change it to Aftermarket. While the name did shift, the concept was solid: "The magazine was very quickly established in the market with the highest audited circulation of all the sector publications, over 30,000 copies a month."


Great relationships
While a few things changed, many of the elements that made Aftermarket a success were there from the beginning: "We had a lot of support from top aftermarket suppliers, people like Luk/Schaeffler, people like Ferodo and Mintex on the braking side, We had a great relationship with NGK which still goes on between the company and the magazine.

The team behind the title was vital to the success of Aftermarket over the years: "We had a very good team that worked well together. We were respected for the knowledge we had of the market we were serving. Over the years, there was an average of 11 people on the title. On the editorial side there was generally four permanent staff, and some contributors as there are now.
Sales wise we had three people, then accounts and yours truly who stuck his nose into every division there was.

"We were able to act as a sounding board for what people wanted to do, as the market changed we changed with it. I think the strength of any publication is its knowledge of the industry it is serving. This can be used as a source of information for new companies coming in. They can look at what's available in the market already, they can listen to conversations and this enables them to come up with a strategy.

"Publishers are very often the holders of bulk information. You don't have to find a consultant – you can find someone who's been in the industry for some considerable time at a magazine and ask them. The publishing business is a broad spectrum information source, and you can get a lot of information from publications covering any sector.”


Strength
While the title adapted with the times, it did not fundamentally change according to Bob:"Part of the strength of the brand was it didn't change in any great way. It was designed to be the number one information source in the industry. That's what we set out to create and that's what it became. We knew what we were talking about.” While the Aftermarket ethos remained stable, publishing changed dramatically as the 1990s became the 2000s and the internet rose to prominence:

"I think the one thing that is worth commenting on is the general change in business-to-business publishing, because we were very much a magazine with a website. Meanwhile, people were beginning to spend more and more of their marketing budget online which meant that the magazines in the marketplace weren't picking up the revenues they had been, so they had a change of direction. That meant we were working online too, hence the launch of aftermarketnetwork.com, now aftermarketonline.net."

There was more to Aftermarket than just a magazine though: "We also had the great benefit of course of also having a wide knowledge of the exhibitions business.

We were working with the SMMT as sales and marketing consultant for the Automotive Trade Show. It was rather like Automechanika, although without the German spelling."

Ultimately, the time came in 2015 when Bob retired and the magazine was sold to DFA Media. Looking back on what he created and the many years overseeing his magazine, Bob observed: "We were around for a great number of years. It became an established title. We clearly had a pretty successful formula which was consistent and we were good at what we did. We achieved our ambition, which was to become the number one book in the marketplace."


Wisdom
Aftermarket is very proud to work with a number of expert contributors who have shared their wisdom with the readership over the years.

One such contributor is business guru Neil Pattemore: "25 years ago, I was running a European diagnostics business that was one of the advertisers who supported the first edition of Aftermarket, in what was then a bound product card format magazine”.

“Over the intervening years, the magazine has grown to be one of the most respected sector publications and more recently, as an aftermarket business expert with a deep involvement in aftermarket related legislation, I have become a regular contributor. My direct involvement was to help readers understand and address the changing aftermarket sector as vehicle technology became ever more complicated, allied to increasing demands that not only focused on repairing vehicles, but also in how to run their businesses in an increasingly competitive and legislatively influenced environment. This was further supported by the creation of 'Top Technician' that recognises the best technicians in the country. "In the next 25 years, these challenges are likely to become even more important and therefore Aftermarket remains an important source of news, product information and business support – so maybe nothing has changed!"


A new chapter
In 2015 Aftermarket was bought by business-to-business publishers DFA Media, and a new chapter in the history of the magazine was opened. Commenting on the decision to buy the title, publishing director Ian Atkinson said: “It was an opportunity too good to pass up on. We were aware of the reputation the magazine and the owners who launched Aftermarket had built up over the previous 25 years. “We relished the opportunity to take on this mantle and work in such an important and thriving sector of British industry.”
    

According to Ian, the company is very pleased to be able to include Aftermarket in its stable of publications: “As well as having areas of crossover with our other titles, for example compressed air within our magazine Hydraulics and Pneumatics,  it is also fantastic to branch out into new areas.”


Watch this space
On plans for the magazine going forward, Ian observed: “I’m tempted to say ‘watch this space!’  Firstly, it will to continue to be the leading source of information for the automotive aftermarket sector but also to develop new, faster and better ways of regularly communicating with our readers. Also, going forward we see Aftermarket as a vehicle to help garages with hands on practical help in a greater way through workshops for example. Some form of ‘live’ version of Aftermarket is an obvious goal
as well.”
 

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    The car owner is often unaware of this, as they see only the ‘HMI’ (human machine interface) that allows them to select and control functions and along with many other electronically controlled ‘things’, the expectation is that ‘it just works’.

    Two key elements are changing with today’s and tomorrow’s cars. Firstly, they are changing into more sophisticated, interactive electronic systems, which require high levels of software compliance. Frequently this can mean that the vehicle needs ‘updating’ which may apply to one system or the complete vehicle. Today this is increasingly conducted by using standardised interface (vehicle communication interfaces – VCI’s) and pass through programming by establishing a direct connection between the vehicle and the vehicle manufacturer’s website. This is now being used even at the level of replacing basic components, such as a battery or engine management system components.

    Secondly, vehicles are increasingly being connected through telematics systems so that the car is becoming part of ‘the internet of things’. This allows remote communication with the vehicle to provide a range of new services to the vehicle owner, driver, or occupants. These broadly fall into two categories – consumer related services, such as internet radio stations, link to e-mails, finding the nearest free parking space and much more, or business related access to in-vehicle data to allow remote monitoring of the status of the vehicle for predictive maintenance, remote diagnostics, vehicle use, pay-as-you-drive insurance etc.

    Increasing isolation
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    Why is this isolation and protection of the in-vehicle systems so critical? Apart from the obvious protection against any malicious attack, there is an increasing safety issue. Thinking longer term, what happens when semi-autonomous cars or fully autonomous cars come into your workshop?
        
    The key question is how to conduct effective repairs on these vehicle systems. At first glance, it may be the basic servicing still needs to be done, but even this will become more difficult, with certain items already requiring electronic control or re-setting. As this develops into more sophisticated systems, the vehicle manufacturer may try and impose more control over who is doing what to ‘their’ vehicles, based on their claim that they have a lifetime responsibility of the functionality of the vehicle and therefore need to know who is doing what where and when. This may lead to an increasing requirement for independent operators to have some form of accreditation to ensure sufficient levels of technical competence before being allowed to work on a vehicle. However, there is also a strong argument in many European countries (the UK included) that this is a market forces issue and that it is the choice of the customer who they trust to repair their vehicle and it is the responsibility of the repairer to be adequately trained and equipped.

    What’s coming?
    Will this market forces attitude still continue when the autonomous vehicle systems are part of the intrinsic safety of the vehicle? This is increasingly becoming the case as these semi or fully autonomous systems take over more control of the vehicle and stop any driver control.
       
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    This raises an interesting argument about who should be allowed to work on a vehicle as the correct repair procedures become increasingly critical. Of course, vehicle manufacturers will continue to have full access to the vehicle and it’s systems, which increasingly will be via remote (telematics) access. This may even compromise the access available to authorised repairers (main dealers), but is seen as a necessary requirement to ensure that the vehicle has been repaired correctly and that the in-vehicle software is still functioning correctly.

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    Controlling competition
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    Want to know more?
    Find out how Neil’s consultancy for garage owners can benefit you by visiting xenconsultancy.com.

  • Vehicle Type Approval revisions: Threat or opportunity? 

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    Vibrant, innovative and competitive
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    The existing (Euro 5) legislation contains important rights of access to repair and maintenance information (RMI). These rights have been (mainly) transferred over into the new EU whole vehicle Type Approval that will come into force in Sept 2020 for new models entering the market. This revised Type Approval legislation (it has not yet been allocated a document number) is based on the existing Type Approval requirements, but also introduces some important new requirements that help the aftermarket. This new legislation will considerably improve the system of access to repair and maintenance information (RMI), for example:

    The continued possibility to communicate with the vehicle’s technical information/data via the standardised on-board diagnostic connector, which is now better clarified and which makes clear that third party service providers should not be barred from accessing vitally important vehicle data when the vehicle is in motion (for read-only functions). This is a good first-step towards the adaptation of our sector with the digital economy and the connected vehicle: “For the purpose of vehicle OBD, diagnostics, repair and maintenance, the direct vehicle data stream shall be made available through the serial data port on the standardised data link connector... When the vehicle is in motion, the data shall only be made available for read-only functions.”

    The information needed for preparation or repair of vehicles for roadworthiness testing has been included into the RMI definition, as this information was not available via the Roadworthiness Directive 2014/45/EU and new test methods that will use the ‘electronic vehicle interface’ will require more technical information;

    An adaptation of the format of the RMI to the state-of-the-art, which means the technical repair information can also be obtained in an electronically processable form – especially useful for technical data publishers and replacement parts catalogue producers;

    A new paragraph that recognises the fast-pace of change of vehicle technologies: Technical progress introducing new methods or echniques for vehicle diagnostics and repair, such as remote access to vehicle information and software, should not weaken the objective of this Regulation with respect to access to vehicle repair and maintenance information for independent operators.

    A new definition of ‘non-discrimination’ that not only includes authorised repairers, but also now the vehicle manufacturers themselves if they also provide repair and maintenance services, “...so as to ensure that the independent vehicle repair and maintenance market as a whole can compete with authorised dealers, regardless of whether the vehicle manufacturer gives such information to authorised dealers and repairers or uses such information for the repair and maintenance purposes itself, it is necessary to set out the details of the information to be provided for the purposes of access to vehicle repair and maintenance information.”

    Empowered
    The revised Type Approval legislation will also introduce increased market surveillance requirements that is aimed at not only checking vehicle emissions compliance following the Dieselgate scandal, but also for the Type Approval of replacement components related to both emission and safety related systems.
        
    The European Commission will also be empowered to consider the remote connection to a vehicle; “...to take account of technical and regulatory developments or prevent misuse by updating the requirements concerning the access to vehicle OBD information and vehicle repair and maintenance information, including the repair and maintenance activities supported by wireless wide area networks,” (this is using the mobile ‘phone operator networks, as already used for today’s ‘connected car’).
        
    So, the EU aftermarket associations – ably assisted by their UK members, have fought to get some important elements in the new legislation. This is good but – and there is always a ‘but’ – this legislative text provides a good basis to address some of the key issues facing the aftermarket today, but there is still work to be done – both in Brussels and here in the UK concerning the government’s position to ensure that the requirements of this European legislation remain applicable in the UK after Brexit.
        
    As is often the case, the ‘devil is in the detail’ and in the case of the new Type Approval legislation, this will become part of the ‘technical requirements’ that will be developed and defined in the ‘Delegated Acts and Technical Annexes’ which will be discussed as part of the implementation of this new legislation. This will include important topics, such as using security certificates to access data via the OBD port, which must also include a legislative process to avoid vehicle manufacturers implementing difficult, restrictive, anti-competitive or costly schemes, or simply mandating that you register your customers with your competitor (the VM) before you can offer your services.

    There will also be other legislation which may impact the technical requirements of this Type Approval revision, such as GDPR (much vehicle generated data is considered personal data), the digital single market, B2B platforms – all of which will also become familiar aspects of your new business models in the future. [ends]

    Clearly, much new EU legislation is on the way and it is vital that the UK Government ensures that these important RMI provisions are ‘carried over’ in the vehicle Type Approval, as well as in other related legislative requirements, after Brexit.

    The future of the aftermarket is rapidly moving into being part of the wider digital economy – and the aftermarket cannot survive in this ‘shark infested’ sector without legislative support – so support the aftermarket associations – they have done good work so far, but there is still much work yet to be done.

    xenconsultancy.com

  • Train in vain?  

    You’re never too old to learn, as they say. Well in this industry they should say you are never too old to stop learning. If you do stop learning, you might never catch up, and then where will you be?
        
    In June, like much of the industry we were at Automechanika Birmingham. As always it was highly illuminating. We are not going to give you a full lowdown on the event here though. If you want that, turn to page 30 where we have all the info you are ever likely to need. There is one aspect of it we would like to cover though – change, and what the impact can be.

    During our three days at the show, we noted all the new technology, factoring in electric vehicles and hybrids, as well as all the ongoing developments within the internal combustion engine. EVs and hybrids might take up the column inches, but it is conventional powertrain vehicles that make up the majority on the roads still, and will continue to do so for some time. It might sound like stating the obvious, but it was made very clear that nothing will stay the same forever, so businesses that work on vehicles (that means you, dear readers) need to make sure they keep up to date.

    We’re not telling you anything you didn’t know. It’s just one of those situations where you walk through the various halls, and remember that all that development you spend all your year writing about is a tangible thing, that you can go and touch and see.

    Off-topic; On-message
    While we were at the show, we were able to speak to a wide range of industry figures. One tries to stay focused on the key issues in these sorts of interviews, but during our sit-down (on surprisingly comfortable stools considering their vertiginous height) with IMI chief executive Steve Nash, we went a little off-topic. We were supposed to be talking about Automechanika Birmingham, and you can see that in the show feature, but we ended up talking about the history of the sector and where technology is going.

    "The IMI will be 100 years old in 2020,” said Steve. “There is a real parallel in what was happening then, and what is happening now. 100 years ago,  just after the First World War we had seen that natural explosion in technology that wars create. Before the war, cars were very noticablely horseless carriages. By the 1920s you had sophisticated cars, and it was no longer appropriate to have the local blacksmith tending to them, which is what happened. This is why we were set up.  It was to try and introduce some professional standards to the industry.

    “Fast forward 100 years and we are there again at the quantum point we were then, where the technology is moving rapidly ahead of the people in the industry, and we have got to move rapidly to keep up. I don't think it is appropriate to ask people to engage with potentially lethal high voltage electrics without knowing they are properly equipped and trained."

    Steve added: "If you look at Volkswagen, they are quoted as saying that from 2019 they will bring out a new electric vehicle to somewhere within one of their ranges every month. We are moving into a different era, and the skills have got to move with the times."

    Technology     
    Move with the times indeed. It’s a lot to take in, but no challenge is insurmountable. While the various technological marvels and new products on show might seem too much to deal with, if you make sure you regularly undertake training to develop your skills, you should be able to keep up and get a handle on it all.

    Through the show, there were many seminars available for free. Some were in Aftermarket’s very own Seminar Theatre, as well as in the various other dedicated venues. Considering the extent of development going on in the sector, we wonder sometimes why these sorts of sessions are not completely overrun by businesses looking to stay up to date. Obviously not everyone can attend, you need to stay up to date.

    Continuing professional development (CPD) is something you need to pursue. Training is not just for the young. It is vital for existing technicians, to stay young in mind and attitude.

    We regularly talk about training, as regular readers know. We have a standalone section that covers it every month (pages 62-63 in this issue while we have your attention), where we discuss and cover training, both in terms of outcomes and available courses. You don’t just need ongoing training because of changes to vehicle construction and engine type either. MOT requirements mean testers need to undertake annual training, and the new MOT regulations that came into force in May have only reinforced this.

    Top idea
    Training can take you a long way. We recently held the finals for Top Technician and Top Garage. One thing that we always notice at the semi-finals and the finals of Top Technician is that when you are talking to the contestants, training comes up constantly. They will tell you about all the courses they have been on, and all the skills development they pursue. If they come up across a difficult problem they will research and follow it through to its successful conclusion. Accessing training and looking to find the route case of particularly interesting problems are both goals for participants. CPD is a mantra and a passion here.

    This might not always be the best use of time and resources in the moment, but they see it as an investment in the future. It will pay off later for them. Clearly when you are looking at the bottom line and trying to keep pushing forward and push jobs out the door this cannot always be the priority. However, if you can factor this kind of thinking into your day and follow up with training, you will be heading in the right direction.

    In the end, it’s all investment whether it is a spanking new piece of kit, or training to enable you to work on the latest vehicles. Equipment will always need to be replaced in the end, sad as it is to admit when you have bought the latest doohickey that really will help you, but knowledge breeds knowledge, sparks new ideas, and helps you and your business grow. Put your money where your life is, and get to it.



  • Annual training is sadly not enough 

    Every MOT tester is doing their annual MOT tester exam, and every tester should be doing their annual training which should match the syllabus supplied by DVSA each year.

    These days of compliance there is sadly more to be done if you want to remain on the compliant side of the DVSA’s thinking. With a revised Sixth Edition Testing Guide there is plenty to read up on, and oh yes there is just the matter of the new Testing Manual from May 2018. What the DVSA are saying is that we all need to make sure we are fully aware of scheme changes.

    Section 6 of the DVSA Guide to MOT Risk Reduction covers tester competence and integrity. In this section, we can see the DVSA starting to underline the need for CPD outside of the Annual Training syllabus, and the need for evidence of ongoing training. In fairness to the DVSA, they do state ‘evidence of’, so if we are not recording our CPD we will start to fall foul of the rules and open ourselves up to scrutiny by DVSA.

    Let’s keep going. The Site Assessment Risk Scoring Guide asks if there is there evidence of a regular staff training/improvement programme.It asks for records of regular, staff training covering:

  • Financial understanding in the garage business 

    Once upon a time, conventional wisdom suggested that if there was money in the bank account at the end of the month, things were going reasonably well. Book-keeping and accounting were fine, but only for accountants. Servicing and repairing vehicles was for garage owners and technicians – people like you and me.
        That was then and now is now. In a world of declining margins, what was good enough for our predecessors will not be good enough for the competitive and ever challenging business climate you and I face today and certainly not good enough to sustain an efficient garage business in the future.
        In short, understanding your numbers – especially the key performance indicators (KPIs) that tell you at a glance just how well or not so well your business is doing – is crucial.

    Know our numbers
    Realistically without having a firm grasp where the numbers come from and what they are trying so desperately to show us, we can’t even begin to discuss our financial situation with our accountants. Why should we know our numbers?
        The demographics of most garage owners tells us something. Most are technicians first, businessmen second.  Up and down the country, the story behind most garages will involve a good technician whose core knowledge is based around repairing vehicles all of sudden, waking up to find themselves owning a garage business.
        Most don’t have the skillset needed, the business acumen, or knowledge of marketing, customer service, operational management, reception management etc. Then again, why should they? There is no qualification needed, unlike in Germany where you would have to undertake a three-year graduate programme before you can manage of own an independent garage business. The garage business, like most other service businesses ,is all about raw materials and finished goods. It’s all about commerce – the exchange of goods and services for the compensation of one kind or another; In our case revenue. It’s about creating value, adding value, and creating services and products that we can sell for more than what they cost us, in order to make a profit. Isn’t that what business is all about? Is profit something to be ashamed of? Is it a dirty word?
        As mentioned earlier, the problem with our world is most garage owners and managers lack an understanding of automotive management, especially the labour side of service, given that this is the only commodity that a garage sells, labour. Some may argue that we also sell parts, well we may do. However, we don’t have control over these purchases. These are by-products of what and how much labour we sell.
        More to the point most garage owners and managers fail to recognise the value they add to the process in terms of service, skill, competence, quality, reliability and ability to respond to customer wants, needs and expectations. What happens is that garage owners set their labour rates because it’s the going rate in the given area. The only thing we sell, our only revenue stream – call it what you want – and we decide the value of it by picking a figure from the sky.
        Our numbers come from all the costs and all the revenue associated with operating your garage business. Whether we like it or not, to be successful in our business, understanding the numbers is a good place to start. My experience tells me most of us refuse to take the time or make the effort to really understand what the numbers represent and what KPIs have the biggest impact of our garage.   

    Adapt
    What do we need to know? I believe you cannot manage a garage from underneath a vehicle in today’s increasing competitive marketplace. You have to adapt to managing the business rather the business managing you. You almost have to be emotionally involved with those numbers to be successful today. Of course, our business is all about repairing vehicles and most garage owners or managers expertise is in this area. However, it is your responsibility, not your accountant’s or book keeper’s, to monitor and manage your numbers. Having the ability to reflect the health and strength of your business at any given time or a specific period is crucial for your success.
        You can only get out of financial reporting what you put in. Your accountant will only advise you on the information you provide. Everything about your garage will depend on the quality of that information the accuracy of those numbers. The numbers are yours, the business is yours so make sure your reporting and analysis are timely and as accurate as possible.
        Your numbers and accounting are only useful if they are used as a means to an end, a catalyst to change your behaviour, your processes, your attitude in order to change the direction of your business for better financial performance in the future. Remember this: All financial data is historic – it has already happened. Time spent gathering and analysing it is massively important so you can draw the benefits of this process. I urge you to monitor your KPIs daily, weekly and monthly and everything else will take care of itself.

    Cruical
    It wasn’t really very complicated for me even in my early days, as I realised how crucial to my success to stay on top of my day to day data capture was. I made sure it was complete and relevant to what I was trying to measure, whether it was productivity and utilisation of my technicians, the labour and recovery rate, or the fact that every labour hour we sold gave us approximately. another £18 profit on parts.
        Think about how much time you spend learning and understanding and what they are trying to tell you. Determine whether or not your financial professional is helping you to understand these numbers more clearly than you do right. Start the journey right now and I can assure you, your garage business will benefit.  

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