Industry urged to 'brace for change' at latest IAAF briefing

Published:  27 March, 2018

'Sweeping change’ was the focus at the most recent Independent Automotive Aftermarket Federation (IAAF) industry briefing, held at Phocas Business Intelligence Software in Coventry on 15 March.

All the latest industry developments were covered by IAAF Membership Development Manager Mike Smallbone.

Guest speakers included Nona Bowkis from Lawgistics discussing General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into effect on 25 May, and Steve Carter from Train4auto Consultancy, addressing how hybrid and electric vehicles as well as hydrogen fuel-cell technology will revolutionise the future.

Mike Smallbone said: “It was clear our members hugely benefitted from learning more about GDPR and electric vehicle technology, and the impact both will have on them personally and as part of the aftermarket.

“These briefings are gathering more momentum as we go on; they’re providing real value to members in terms of industry insight. We are expecting another highly engaging session and large turnout at the next briefing.”

The next meeting will be hosted by The Turbo Guy in Glasgow on 17 May. IAAF is advising members to book early to avoid disappointment by emailing Ann Silvester at anns@iaaf.co.uk.

Related Articles

  • Auto-motives: Looking ahead to stay ahead  

    It would be tough to overstate the impact and importance of the automotive aftermarket. Its success not only contributes to the success of its parent industry, but it stimulates competition throughout the manufacturing, distribution and wholesale sectors.
    As technology has improved, the aftermarket has only become more versatile and more attractive to customers. The growing trend towards custom vehicle modifications, environmentally friendly cars, and Internet of Things-enabled smart sensors have only contributed to the range and depth of opportunities available to businesses and their customers alike. But with new opportunities invariably come new challenges, and the automotive aftermarket must find its own way to tackle them.

  • Right2Choose returns as ‘Your Car, Your Choice’  

    ‘Your Car, Your Choice’ is the new rallying cry for the sector, as the Independent Automotive Aftermarket Federation (IAAF) relaunches Right2Choose for today’s world.

  • New appointments at Comline  

    Comline Auto Parts has strengthened its sales marketing and customer service provision to the aftermarket following two new appointments.

  • Electric future shock  

    The need to adapt to changing vehicle technology is one of the main challenges of our time in the sector. Increasing connectivity and a vastly more complicated conventional vehicle provide a whole raft of obstacles on their own, before you even get to the rise of electric vehicles and hybrids.

    Add to that a more uncertain legislative environment resulting from rules not quite keeping up with the technology coming in, and you’ve got yourself a whole host of issues that the entire industry needs to stay on top of if it is going to continue to offer a sterling service to customers.

    Let’s look at electric vehicles. For Tom Harrison Lord from Fox Agency, the b2b marketing company specialising in the automotive sector,  Automechanika Birmingham offered a troubling glimpse into the future:  “This summer’s Automechanika Birmingham was entertaining and enjoyable as ever, but it also exemplified a worrying trend in the motor industry today. With the advancement of electric vehicles, there are going to be some rapid and stark changes ahead. The automotive aftermarket, however, seems to be burying its head in the sand.”


    Access
    The key, as it has been in the past, is access. In this case, the right to be able to repair vehicles. Think that’s all sorted? Perhaps not:  “The rise of the electric cars and vehicles is something that could hit the automotive aftermarket hard – in particular, independent garages.

    “Many, if not all, electric vehicles invalidate their manufacturer warranty if essential work is carried out on the electrical systems by someone other than the main dealer. What’s more, many cars with batteries, such as the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, have warranties on the electrical components lasting up to ten years.

    “Having no choice but to use the main dealer for a full decade shows just why independent workshops will have fewer vehicles coming through the doors in the years ahead.”

  • A shock to the system and how to avoid it  

    Hybrid and electric vehicles (H/EVs) are an ever-day reality, and are becoming more popular with drivers and carmakers.
    “Electrified powertrains are emerging as manufacturers’ preferred means of meeting stringent future emissions legislation,“ says Jonathan Levett, technical trainer for Delphi Technologies Aftermarket.

Most read content


Search

Sign Up

For the latest news and updates from Aftermarket Magazine.


Poll

Where should the next Automechanika show be held?



Facebook


©DFA Media 1999-2018