New 60 Litre Pack Size

Published:  02 April, 2018

Morris Lubricants is now offering a new 60 litre pack size in the following grades:
• Multivis ADT C3 5W-40
[part number: CFF 060]
• Multivis ADT C3 5W-30
[part number: CTH 060]
• Multivis ADT FD 5W-30
[part number: MND 060]
• Multivis ADT VX 5W-30
[part number: VXC 060]
• Servol 10W-40 [part number: SPS 060]
Morris Lubricants is also offering a lever pump [part reference: 7602] to fit its new 60 litre drums. Please ask Morris Lubricants to add a drum pump when placing your order.
www.morrislubricants.co.uk

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  • Certifying your future 

    The rate at which the modern car is developing to include new functions based on new technologies is exponential.

    The car owner is often unaware of this, as they see only the ‘HMI’ (human machine interface) that allows them to select and control functions and along with many other electronically controlled ‘things’, the expectation is that ‘it just works’.

    Two key elements are changing with today’s and tomorrow’s cars. Firstly, they are changing into more sophisticated, interactive electronic systems, which require high levels of software compliance. Frequently this can mean that the vehicle needs ‘updating’ which may apply to one system or the complete vehicle. Today this is increasingly conducted by using standardised interface (vehicle communication interfaces – VCI’s) and pass through programming by establishing a direct connection between the vehicle and the vehicle manufacturer’s website. This is now being used even at the level of replacing basic components, such as a battery or engine management system components.

    Secondly, vehicles are increasingly being connected through telematics systems so that the car is becoming part of ‘the internet of things’. This allows remote communication with the vehicle to provide a range of new services to the vehicle owner, driver, or occupants. These broadly fall into two categories – consumer related services, such as internet radio stations, link to e-mails, finding the nearest free parking space and much more, or business related access to in-vehicle data to allow remote monitoring of the status of the vehicle for predictive maintenance, remote diagnostics, vehicle use, pay-as-you-drive insurance etc.

    Increasing isolation
    The in-vehicle E/E architecture is therefore not only increasingly complicated and inter-active, it is more vulnerable to incorrect repair processes. To ensure that this risk is minimised, the vehicle manufacturers are increasingly isolating any possible external connections from the in-vehicle communication buses and electronic control modules. Effectively, today’s 16 pin OBD connector will no longer be directly connected to the CAN Bus and in turn to the ECU(s) but will communicate via a secure in-vehicle gateway. There may also be a new standardised connection which becomes a local wireless connection in the workshop as well as having remote telematics connection, but in both cases, the access to in-vehicle data is no longer directly connected.
        
    Why is this isolation and protection of the in-vehicle systems so critical? Apart from the obvious protection against any malicious attack, there is an increasing safety issue. Thinking longer term, what happens when semi-autonomous cars or fully autonomous cars come into your workshop?
        
    The key question is how to conduct effective repairs on these vehicle systems. At first glance, it may be the basic servicing still needs to be done, but even this will become more difficult, with certain items already requiring electronic control or re-setting. As this develops into more sophisticated systems, the vehicle manufacturer may try and impose more control over who is doing what to ‘their’ vehicles, based on their claim that they have a lifetime responsibility of the functionality of the vehicle and therefore need to know who is doing what where and when. This may lead to an increasing requirement for independent operators to have some form of accreditation to ensure sufficient levels of technical competence before being allowed to work on a vehicle. However, there is also a strong argument in many European countries (the UK included) that this is a market forces issue and that it is the choice of the customer who they trust to repair their vehicle and it is the responsibility of the repairer to be adequately trained and equipped.

    What’s coming?
    Will this market forces attitude still continue when the autonomous vehicle systems are part of the intrinsic safety of the vehicle? This is increasingly becoming the case as these semi or fully autonomous systems take over more control of the vehicle and stop any driver control.
       
    Certainly, anyone attempting any DIY repair will find it much more difficult to access the information or the tools/equipment needed to repair their vehicle, as this will be beyond the knowledge and economic reach of the ‘Sunday morning repairer’, but should DIY repairs even be allowed in the future?

    This raises an interesting argument about who should be allowed to work on a vehicle as the correct repair procedures become increasingly critical. Of course, vehicle manufacturers will continue to have full access to the vehicle and it’s systems, which increasingly will be via remote (telematics) access. This may even compromise the access available to authorised repairers (main dealers), but is seen as a necessary requirement to ensure that the vehicle has been repaired correctly and that the in-vehicle software is still functioning correctly.

    The counter argument is that this also provides unacceptable levels of control and monitoring of the complete independent aftermarket – so what could be a solution?

    Controlling competition
    No one is trying to say that safety and security are not important, but there must be a balance as independent operators will continue to need access to diagnostic, repair, service and maintenance information and continue to offer competitive services to the consumer. The European legislator must protect competition, but this may also come with appropriate controls and this may mean that tomorrow’s technicians will need to demonstrate certain levels of competence, together with an audit trail of the work which has been performed in the event of a vehicle malfunction.

    Independent operators already need high levels of technical competence – necessary for the consumer and the effective operation of their own business, but in the future this may also mean a form of licensing or certification that is required by legislation. If this becomes necessary, then it has to be appropriate, reasonable and proportionate.

    The alternative is that the vehicle manufacturer could become the only choice to diagnose, service and repair the vehicles of tomorrow. I am sure we all agree that it is not what we want or need, so it may be that the increasing technology of tomorrow’s vehicles is the reason that the industry should now embrace change to mirror other safety related industry sectors, such as Gas Safe or NICEIC – qualified, competent and registered. The future is changing and the aftermarket needs to change with it.

    Want to know more?
    Find out how Neil’s consultancy for garage owners can benefit you by visiting xenconsultancy.com.

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  • New Philips EcoPro lamp range  

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  • Financial understanding in the garage business 

    Once upon a time, conventional wisdom suggested that if there was money in the bank account at the end of the month, things were going reasonably well. Book-keeping and accounting were fine, but only for accountants. Servicing and repairing vehicles was for garage owners and technicians – people like you and me.
        That was then and now is now. In a world of declining margins, what was good enough for our predecessors will not be good enough for the competitive and ever challenging business climate you and I face today and certainly not good enough to sustain an efficient garage business in the future.
        In short, understanding your numbers – especially the key performance indicators (KPIs) that tell you at a glance just how well or not so well your business is doing – is crucial.

    Know our numbers
    Realistically without having a firm grasp where the numbers come from and what they are trying so desperately to show us, we can’t even begin to discuss our financial situation with our accountants. Why should we know our numbers?
        The demographics of most garage owners tells us something. Most are technicians first, businessmen second.  Up and down the country, the story behind most garages will involve a good technician whose core knowledge is based around repairing vehicles all of sudden, waking up to find themselves owning a garage business.
        Most don’t have the skillset needed, the business acumen, or knowledge of marketing, customer service, operational management, reception management etc. Then again, why should they? There is no qualification needed, unlike in Germany where you would have to undertake a three-year graduate programme before you can manage of own an independent garage business. The garage business, like most other service businesses ,is all about raw materials and finished goods. It’s all about commerce – the exchange of goods and services for the compensation of one kind or another; In our case revenue. It’s about creating value, adding value, and creating services and products that we can sell for more than what they cost us, in order to make a profit. Isn’t that what business is all about? Is profit something to be ashamed of? Is it a dirty word?
        As mentioned earlier, the problem with our world is most garage owners and managers lack an understanding of automotive management, especially the labour side of service, given that this is the only commodity that a garage sells, labour. Some may argue that we also sell parts, well we may do. However, we don’t have control over these purchases. These are by-products of what and how much labour we sell.
        More to the point most garage owners and managers fail to recognise the value they add to the process in terms of service, skill, competence, quality, reliability and ability to respond to customer wants, needs and expectations. What happens is that garage owners set their labour rates because it’s the going rate in the given area. The only thing we sell, our only revenue stream – call it what you want – and we decide the value of it by picking a figure from the sky.
        Our numbers come from all the costs and all the revenue associated with operating your garage business. Whether we like it or not, to be successful in our business, understanding the numbers is a good place to start. My experience tells me most of us refuse to take the time or make the effort to really understand what the numbers represent and what KPIs have the biggest impact of our garage.   

    Adapt
    What do we need to know? I believe you cannot manage a garage from underneath a vehicle in today’s increasing competitive marketplace. You have to adapt to managing the business rather the business managing you. You almost have to be emotionally involved with those numbers to be successful today. Of course, our business is all about repairing vehicles and most garage owners or managers expertise is in this area. However, it is your responsibility, not your accountant’s or book keeper’s, to monitor and manage your numbers. Having the ability to reflect the health and strength of your business at any given time or a specific period is crucial for your success.
        You can only get out of financial reporting what you put in. Your accountant will only advise you on the information you provide. Everything about your garage will depend on the quality of that information the accuracy of those numbers. The numbers are yours, the business is yours so make sure your reporting and analysis are timely and as accurate as possible.
        Your numbers and accounting are only useful if they are used as a means to an end, a catalyst to change your behaviour, your processes, your attitude in order to change the direction of your business for better financial performance in the future. Remember this: All financial data is historic – it has already happened. Time spent gathering and analysing it is massively important so you can draw the benefits of this process. I urge you to monitor your KPIs daily, weekly and monthly and everything else will take care of itself.

    Cruical
    It wasn’t really very complicated for me even in my early days, as I realised how crucial to my success to stay on top of my day to day data capture was. I made sure it was complete and relevant to what I was trying to measure, whether it was productivity and utilisation of my technicians, the labour and recovery rate, or the fact that every labour hour we sold gave us approximately. another £18 profit on parts.
        Think about how much time you spend learning and understanding and what they are trying to tell you. Determine whether or not your financial professional is helping you to understand these numbers more clearly than you do right. Start the journey right now and I can assure you, your garage business will benefit.  

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    WAI product has begun leaving Bognor Regis and arriving at Marathon Warehouse Distribution’s national distribution centre in Redditch and a 14-branch network throughout the UK.

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