Top Technician 2017 winner to be announced at Top Tech Live

Published:  19 July, 2017

Top Technician 2017 reached the final last week, and all eyes now turn towards Top Tech Live, where the winner will be announced in September.

The final took place on Thursday 13 July at the RMI Academy of Skills in Southam, Warwickshire as the remaining contestants threw themselves into the last tasks of the competition. 

The finalists were: Shaun Miller   Miller’s Garage, Berkshire Kevin Toms  FRL Autoservices, Devon Karl Weaver  Bull Lane Garage, Kent Richard Lukins Fiorano Cars, London Neil Currie  Robertson Gemini, Dumfries & Galloway

Each of the five faced the range of challenges with aplomb, but only one can be named Top Technician for 2017.

Top Tech Live All the finalists will be on hand at Top Tech Live on Saturday 16 September at the Henry Ford Academy to see who will be revealed as the winner for 2017, along with winners from the past and many significant figures from the sector.

There’s far more to the day than the announcement though.

Top Tech Live is able to offer an exclusive Ford technical seminar as a result of the location. This is a rare opportunity to receive official instruction from a Ford technical trainer and you will want to make sure you take part.

Then there are the speakers. A number of judges from the final will be there. Andy Savva, David Massey of ADS, Pico’s Steve Smith and John Batten from AutoIQ will   all be giving top-level presentations on a range of topics

Joining them will be Rob Lewis of Jaguar Land Rover, Peter Coombes of Tech Club and Eliot Smith, as well as representatives from Snap-on and Our Virtual Academy.

That’s a packed schedule for one day, and it’s easy to make sure you are there.

Tickets are £82 plus VAT , but anyone who entered the competition gets a special discount and pays just £62 plus VAT.

To assure your place call  01732 370340 today to book.

Top Technician 2017 Top Technician 2017 is sponsored by Ring Automotive and Snap-on.

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  • Under no pressure 

    Once the news started to spread about my Top Technician win, the phone started to ring with more interesting and challenging jobs, usually ones that have been doing the rounds between other garages without success.
      
     A phone call came from a local parts supplier, a visiting rep was having issues with a DPF. They believed it needed a simple regeneration to get it back on the road and asked if I would be able to do the job. After checking the Blue Print G-Scan, the function for a forced regeneration was available, I believed I would be able to carry it out and booked the job in.

    Basic beginnings
    After traveling from two hours away, the vehicle arrived. The customer was questioned, ‘Why do you require a DPF regen?’ Being a parts rep within the motor trade, her garage visits were frequent; various attempts had been made to resolve the issue. With conflicting advice being given and quotes between £600 - £1200 to fix the vehicle, the customer was obviously confused and unsure about what to do.
        
    The engine management light was on, so the obvious place to start was a scan check for fault codes. The vehicle showed P2002: Particulate Trap Below Threshold.
        
    Viewing the live data for the DPF pressure sensor, key on engine off, displayed a 0kpa pressure reading, a good start for a sensor plausibility check. With the engine running and RPM increased, the sensor reported a suspiciously low-pressure reading, not one I would associate with a saturated DPF. I decided to use the Pico Scope to look at the DPF pressure sensor voltage in real time. After confirming the power and ground circuits to be ok at the three wire pressure sensor, the signal wire was checked. Again key on engine off, 750mv was displayed, a sensor plausibility check and again this was good. Starting the vehicle and increasing the revs revealed exactly the opposite to what I had expected, a negative voltage reading. The voltage should increase as the exhaust pressure increases.

    What’s wrong?
    One area I wanted to check was that the pipes were not connected the wrong way around. I decided to use the Mity Vac to apply pressure to the sensor pipe connected in front of the filter. This showed a positive rise in voltage, further proving good sensor functionality and confirming the pipes to be correctly connected. Connecting the Mity Vac to the pipe after the filter and applying pressure, simulated the negative voltage which was seen when the vehicle RPM was increased, simulating the fault. The sensor pipe in front of the filter must be blocked.
        
    I located the steel pipe that is fitted in the exhaust in front of the filter to reveal soot marks, it had been leaking exhaust gasses. On a closer look it was unscrewed from the exhaust while still located in the hole due to the pipe bracket allowing the slight leak of exhaust gasses. Once the pipe was removed it was clear to see the soot had built up and blocked the small hole in the end of the pipe. I unblocked the pipe, checked to make sure the mounting hole on the exhaust was clear and refitted it.
        
    Using the Pico Scope again on the signal wire, it now showed a positive rise in voltage when the RPM was increased. The live data now showed a small pressure increase, the filter was not blocked. With all fault codes cleared, an extended road test was carried out, the pressure reading stayed low throughout and no fault codes reoccurred confirming the fix, the vehicle did not require DPF regeneration.

    With no parts required to fix the vehicle the repair cost was far lower than the customer expected due to the previous attempts. The vehicle was returned to the customer who was surprised by the
    outcome of the repair and relieved by the associated costs.



    TT Archives:  Top Technician issue nine 2016 | www.toptechnician.co.uk


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