Autoelectro’s Nick Hood delivers monthly column

Published:  25 January, 2018

 

Autoelectro’s UK sales manager Nick Hood is now communicating directly with customers via a brand new monthly column, ‘Nick Says.’

Subscribers to Autolectro’s bulletins  will  automatically receive the new e-shot, which looks at  industry hot topics, as well as key developments from the company’s Bradford remanufacturing facility.  

In his first column, Nick asked: “What’s the real price of old core?”  

He also took a trip down memory lane, as he revisited some crucial moments throughout 2017, illustrated some key range introductions and how Autoelectro has embraced new technologies. He also revealed his thoughts about what he and the automotive aftermarket can expect throughout the next 12 months.  

 If readers have any questions that they would like to ask Nick, they are encouraged to send them to him directly – at sales@autoelectro.co.uk with ‘Nick Says’ in the subject header – and he will choose the best of them to answer in forthcoming columns, which will be delivered straight to their inbox.

Anyone not already registered with Autoelectro that is interested in receiving this free monthly supplement should email sales@autoelectro.co.uk  

 

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